Nineteenth Century Art A Critical History

Stephen F. Eisenman, Thomas Crow, Brian Lukacher, Linda Nochlin, David Llewellyn Phillips, Frances K. Pohl

Description

Since its first publication in 1994, this book has established itself as the most popular and highly regarded textbook in the field. It embraces many aspects of the so-called “new” art history while at the same time emphasizing the remarkable vitality, salience, and subversiveness of the era’s best art.

The new edition includes four revised chapters together with a substantially expanded chapter on photography. With more than a dozen new images, this rich and diverse volume will interest students, specialists, and anyone fascinated by this dynamic period.

In addition to Stephen F. Eisenman, the contributors are Thomas Crow, Brian Lukacher, Linda Nochlin, David Llewellyn Phillips, and Frances K. Pohl.

Reviews

Handsomely illustrated…The interpretations of [the artists'] work are thoughtful.

— Atlantic Monthly

An impressive encyclopedic volume…such vigor, clarity, and scholarship that it must be regarded as required reading.

— American Arts Quarterly

Contributors

Stephen F. Eisenman

Author

Stephen F. Eisenman is Professor of Art History at Northwestern University

Thomas Crow

Contributions By

Brian Lukacher

Contributions By

Linda Nochlin

Contributions By

Linda Nochlin is Lila Acheson Wallace Professor of Modern Art Emerita at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. Her publications include The Body in Pieces; Women, Art and Power; The Politics of Vision; Representing Women; Courbet; and Women Artists. Her essay “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” is considered one of the most influential texts in modern art history.

David Llewellyn Phillips

Contributions By

Frances K. Pohl

Contributions By

Frances K. Pohl is the Dr. Mary Ann Vanderzyl Reynolds Professor of Humanities and Professor of Art History at Pomona College in Claremont, California. She received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. Since moving to Pomona in 1985, she has taught a wide variety of courses in nineteenth- and twentieth-century North American art. Her work has focused on the art of the United States, in particular the work of Ben Shahn, about whom she has written two books, and the relationship between the visual arts and working-class culture. Professor Pohl has taught in the United States for many years, but her Canadian origins give her a unique continental perspective on American art.